Seedheads and Sunshine

A few straggling seeds still holding on after Storm Arwen. They look like they have been hand-painted by woodland folk!

The seedheads still offer a refuge for insects, but there is little left in the way of food for birds.

Fading glory.

About to face the wrath of Winter.

Early signs of Spring

There is still time for a blast of Arctic air and for the landscape to disappear under a layer of snow and ice, but the days are gradually pulling out and there are early signs of Spring. Already, I have spotted carpets of snowdrops and clumps of primroses. Catkins are in abundance and the daffodils are not far off flowering.

When the cold winds subside and the sun appears in the sky, the birds come out from their hiding places and sing.

It won’t be long until the leaves start to unfurl from the buds on the branches.

Happy New Year

At this time of year, plants and flowers are a bit thin on the ground. So, I have abandoned my trusty macro lens and have been experimenting with my zoom lens.

From the trees and hedgerows, I have notice little rustlings and tweets. As the trees are bare, some wildlife has been a lot easier to spot. Here are a few birds I have spied recently. I hope you enjoy them.

The ever faithful Robin.
A grey wagtail.
A Sparrowhawk
A curious blackbird.
A Mistle thrush

Goslings

Goslings are introduced to open water within 24 hours of being born. They are raised by both parents which ensures they have a high life expectancy. They migrate with their parents and eventually return to their birthplace.

Geese are loyal to each other and stay together for life.

Egyptian geese

Egyptian geese were introduced to the UK in the late 17th Century as an ornamental bird to adorn the lakes of country estates. They originate from sub-tropical Africa and the Ancient Egyptians considered them sacred. However, in their native homeland, they are regarded as a nuisance because they eat crops.

Until recently in the UK, these birds were quite rare and were mainly confined to a small area of Norfolk. The birds tend to breed in January, traditionally too cold for chicks to survive, but as temperatures have increased over the last 20 years, so too has the population of these birds and they are now found in different parts of the UK.

fullsizeoutput_12b
fullsizeoutput_134b
fullsizeoutput_13d
fullsizeoutput_129