Experimenting with photography

I have a new lens. It is a manual one but attaches to my normal, automated camera. I am still figuring it out… It does not record normal camera data, such as aperture etc, which feels strange, because unless you write it down, you will never know what combination of settings you used for a particular shot! However, you do have to set the ISO on the camera beforehand. I experimented with it yesterday in the countryside after a rain storm and also in a garden. I think it helps you to visualise using manual settings and what they can do, more so than just moving a small dial on the camera, it is more clunky and solid.

I have an old camera which uses film and I am hoping that it will improve my understanding of that. I must also remember to use my tripod with it for extra sharpness! How funny that photography is taking me in a backward direction with old technology.

In terms of post-processing, there was very little to do, other than perhaps resize images.

Cow parsley.
Pink campions in the evening sunlight.
A leaning tree with young leaves.
Pink geraniums
White lilac
Pale purple lilac

New Material

Now that lockdown has eased in the U.K, it is nice to get out with the camera and discover new things to photograph.

This tulip was called ‘Brown Sugar.’ I liked the tones of apricot, gold, cream and dark pink.
Sunlight streaming through a woodland glade filled with narcissus.
Need a rest? This bench has Siberian bugloss adorning it.
A solitary narcissus.
Red tulips about to open.
A tree in blossom.
Delicate pink and white blossom.
Amazingly bright yellow and orangey-red tulips.
An unusual little plant. Possibly Lathyrus – pink, purple, white and blue flowers.

Magnolias

Finally, some Pasque flowers.

10,000 Views – Thank you!

I have noticed today that my blog has clicked over 10,000 views. It has been seen in 75 countries from Nepal to Nicaragua! Thanks for stopping by.

Photography has been a bit limited over the past year due to the pandemic, so I have been learning new tricks on Photoshop with existing pictures. This is my ‘Vintage’ style bluebell.

Frothy white bubbles of cow parsley

It’s everywhere at the moment, lining shady stretches of country lanes and stretches of woodland. It has lots of alternative names including fairy lace. Some think it looks like drifts of snow. It is of course, a popular plant with pollinators.

Cow parsley is a member of the carrot family. It can be confused with hemlock and hogweed, one of which is poisonous and the other which has sap that can burn the skin.

A host of golden daffodils

I wander’d lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretch’d in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced, but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: –
A poet could not but be gay
In such a jocund company!
I gazed – and gazed – but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought.

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills
And dances with the daffodils.

William Wordsworth.

Spring has sprung

Daffodils.

The soft pink and white flowers of Helleborus Emma swaying in the wind.

In the 14th Century, the term ‘springing time’ was used instead of the old English ‘Lent’ or ‘Lenten’. This was referring to plants springing from the ground. It then became ‘spring-time’ and by the 16th Century was shortened to ‘spring.’

Red and bold.

Persephone was the Greek goddess of spring. She spent winters as Queen of the Underworld but returned in spring to preside over rebirth.

Late Winter Colour

The sun was shining this weekend, so it was time to get out into the great outdoors and see what was growing.

Witch hazel.
Dogwood
Pink flowers.
Witch hazel.
Sunlight on a plant.
Snowdrops.

Sissinghurst Revisited

A bit of colour and sunshine to lift the spirits in the depths of Winter, some photographs from earlier in the year.

A bee foraging.
Plants in the shade.

Green flowers – Ixia viridifloria. Introduced by Vita Sackville-West to Sissinghurst, from South Africa.