The Fibonacci sequence in nature

When I saw this plant, ‘Fibonacci sequence’ popped into my head. I have heard of the term ‘Fibonacci sequence in nature,’ but know little about it. So I did some investigating. The Fibonacci sequence starts like this: 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55 and so on forever. Each number is the sum of the two numbers that precede it. 

It appears throughout nature from the design of shells, to the way tree branches grow out of trees, to the development of leaf veins, the pattern of seedheads, the positioning of flower petals (think roses), even the shape of tropical storms. It has been described as “the code of nature’ and runs through the cosmos – even appearing in spiral galaxies. Isn’t nature clever?

 

Advertisements

The Golden Hour

Light. That crucial factor in photography. The golden hour is the period of time just after sunrise or before sunset, which gives a beautiful, golden hue to landscape and portrait pictures. The low angle of the sun makes the shadows softer and longer. The diffused light can emphasize textures and produce specific effects.

The actual duration depends on where you live in the world (and time of year), so if you live near the equator it can be very short as sunset is quickly followed by darkness. Whereas, further north (near the Arctic circle) or south during Spring and Autumn, it can last in excess of an hour.

There is even an app which tells you the time and duration of the Golden Hour, the Blue Hour (just before sunrise and just after sunset), sunrise, sky index, light index as well as celestial events for anywhere you live in the world. All of course, subject to local weather conditions…

But there’s something magical about capturing pictures with that golden glow.

DSC_0385c

This blossom was in a small, wooded dell which was quite dark. The sun came out just before sunset and it appears as if it has been taken with a camera flash.

DSC_0378

The long shadows from the light give an additional focus to the crocuses.

DSC_0381bThe light appears gentler and diffused over the heather.

A carpet of snowdrops …

One week later and the snowdrops were out in force! Galanthus nivalis is one species which self-seeds and spreads quickly. Bees use snowdrops for nectar, when not many other plants are flowering.

DSC_0010DSC_0001DSC_0062bDSC_0066DSC_0074DSC_0030fullsizeoutput_119

Poppy study

These beautiful little poppies in different pastel shades, like hues of sugared almonds are called Papaver rhoeas ‘Mother of Pearl.’ They were selected by the famous painter and gardener, Cedric Morris. He used to collect different colours from hedges and fields.

Unfortunately, the weather was not very favourable when I tried to capture them. It was overcast and they kept swaying in the wind!

DSC_0081bDSC_0046DSC_0066DSC_0111DSC_0072bDSC_0099DSC_0085