Seedheads and Sunshine

A few straggling seeds still holding on after Storm Arwen. They look like they have been hand-painted by woodland folk!

The seedheads still offer a refuge for insects, but there is little left in the way of food for birds.

Fading glory.

About to face the wrath of Winter.

New Material

Now that lockdown has eased in the U.K, it is nice to get out with the camera and discover new things to photograph.

This tulip was called ‘Brown Sugar.’ I liked the tones of apricot, gold, cream and dark pink.
Sunlight streaming through a woodland glade filled with narcissus.
Need a rest? This bench has Siberian bugloss adorning it.
A solitary narcissus.
Red tulips about to open.
A tree in blossom.
Delicate pink and white blossom.
Amazingly bright yellow and orangey-red tulips.
An unusual little plant. Possibly Lathyrus – pink, purple, white and blue flowers.

Magnolias

Finally, some Pasque flowers.

Honey bees and Spring blossoms

The sunlight gave a beautiful ‘high key’ effect to some of the pictures.

Can you see the pollen basket on the hind leg of the bee? Pollen is harvested and carried to the nest or hive.

Blossoms.

A honeybee in mid-flight.

A honeybee dangling underneath a branch.

A honeybee in perfect alignment to the flower.

Spring has sprung

Daffodils.

The soft pink and white flowers of Helleborus Emma swaying in the wind.

In the 14th Century, the term ‘springing time’ was used instead of the old English ‘Lent’ or ‘Lenten’. This was referring to plants springing from the ground. It then became ‘spring-time’ and by the 16th Century was shortened to ‘spring.’

Red and bold.

Persephone was the Greek goddess of spring. She spent winters as Queen of the Underworld but returned in spring to preside over rebirth.

Late Winter Colour

The sun was shining this weekend, so it was time to get out into the great outdoors and see what was growing.

Witch hazel.
Dogwood
Pink flowers.
Witch hazel.
Sunlight on a plant.
Snowdrops.

Sissinghurst Revisited

A bit of colour and sunshine to lift the spirits in the depths of Winter, some photographs from earlier in the year.

A bee foraging.
Plants in the shade.

Green flowers – Ixia viridifloria. Introduced by Vita Sackville-West to Sissinghurst, from South Africa.

Autumn’s end

The first meteorological day of Winter is on December 1st. Some pictures to celebrate the end of the season.

A sycamore in golden light.
Delicate seed heads swaying in a light breeze.
Sunlight reflecting through leaves

Miscellaneous

Several fields are growing this crop of beautiful blue and purple flowers.
Hoverflies feeding on the pollen of blackberry flowers. Blackberries are already beginning to form, a sign that Autumn is not far away.
Pink flower with cow parsley.
The curious peacock.
The last of the pink peonies.
A small meadow with cow parsley.
Barley.